Lincoln Couldn’t Tweet

The critically acclaimed movie, “Lincoln” dramatically chronicles the difficult and contentious lincolnbattle between the 16th president and Congress to work together to pass the 13th amendment, which abolished slavery.

The parallel between our country then and our country today was not missed on many who have seen the movie.  It was a peek into the dark room dealings, reluctant compromising and back scratching that is sometimes necessary for the greater good. The close-up and intimate perspective was intriguing for outsiders.  Historians and academics may debate the amount of creative license in the movie, but the facts are undeniable. It was a difficult and dark time in this country’s journey to freedom.

For those of you who haven’t seen the movie—spoiler alert–the 13th amendment passes.  Slavery was an economic issue grounded in a principle that is contrary to the Constitution, back then it was the radical Republicans who lead the fight against it. No one man gets or deserves credit for the ratification yet Lincoln may have paid the highest price.

Fast forward to 2012 and as we prepare for the Christmas holiday, the fiscal fight continues in Washington, DC.  This week, Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) was organizing the troops with vocal lieutenants Norquist and Gingrich to defend the battle of the Bush tax cuts against the White House.  It looks like the fiscal negotiations are far from concession or compromise. While the current wrangling may not rival the screaming and yelling debates from the movie we can expect more theatrical gridlock and a tsunami of message overload.

Thank God the Congress and President in 1865 could not tweet and 24-hour journalists weren’t following Thaddeus Stevens for up-to-the minute sound bites.

We have already been inundated on television, radio, newspapers, the Internet, and on our phones about the battle over higher taxes and the “fiscal cliff”.  The pugnacious struggle in the movie over the fundamental right of America’s citizens to be free was a morally and fiercely indefensible debate.

President Obama said this week that, “Right now, what the country needs is for us to compromise.” He may well have to  channel the courage, determination and audacity of Lincoln if practical fiscal reform is to have even the slightest chance at success.

Comments

  1. Burroughston Broch says:

    President Obama said this week that, “Right now, what the country needs is for us to compromise.” I agree.

    Unfortunately, the President’s concept of compromise is that he remains firm while the other side caves in. We shall see how that works.

  2. Beverly Fraud says:

    “It was a peek into the dark room dealings, reluctant compromising and back scratching that is sometimes necessary for the greater good”

    Is that your justification for keeping silent while Beverly Hall foisted the largest cheating scandal in United States educational history upon the poor and minority children of Atlanta? You were just too “reluctant” to attack an (at the time) a black icon of education, regardless of what damage she was doing to the educational future of black children in Atlanta?

    It makes one wonder what “back scratching” you were given in order to remain silent to this day, does it not?

    Unlike Lincoln, it appears you lack the integrity to wrestle with these questions, therefore we can expect at best, a non-response, as you have given so many times in the past, or the omnipresent “I can’t respond because I don’t know who you are” when who I am has NOTHING to do with the truth of my words, does it readers? (What few there are LOL)