Maynard Jackson : Setting The Record Straight (Rodney Strong)

Rodney Strong met Maynard Jackson when he worked on Maynard’s first mayoral campaign as student at Morehouse College.

We believe this clip of Strong discussing Jackson’s impact on him as a student, the gift of public service that has guided his life, and how Jackson created the City’s NPU system is relevant as voters in Atlanta prepare to vote on the billion dollar Transportation Referendum on July 31st.

Strong reveals how transportation was one of the policy issues that Maynard faced in the 1970’s, which is interesting considering we are still facing some of these same policy decisions almost 40 years later.

 

Comments

  1. bloggingwhileblue says:

    The comment below came in via email and is being posted with the writer’s consent.

    The Transportation Investment Act is the perfect opportunity for Black businesses to reposition themselves from being seen as “wards of the city” and/or business that take from the system— to businesses that make an economic contribution and support community development.

    The Black community deserves community development over the life of this tax not just transportation because we got transportation that is not the need of the Black community!! Black businesses are the tool to execute that opportunity!

    To describe this new position is simple–Black businesses are economic assets and chief proponents for Black community economic development. As Dr Danny Boston, president of EuQuant most recently said : “One of the most effective strategies for reducing Black unemployment is to support black-owned businesses. This is because two out of every three workers employed by those businesses are Black. In fact, Black businesses can achieve employment outcomes that economic growth policy cannot.”

    Black-owned businesses in Metro Atlanta currently employ more than 52,000 persons and stimulate the employment of an additional 166,000 persons; and

    Black-owned businesses are most often located in operate in neighborhoods that are 44% Black and 35% operate in high poverty areas; and

    We are necessary to provide for and continue the development of the Black community. Black business bring a Community Return on Investment through job creation, taxes, benefits etc. We are in fact, the employer of last resort for some in our communties because we do hire people with less than perfect credentials!

    So it is in the best interest of the powers-that-be, to utilize the Black business community to help overcome the other community issues related to the transportation concerns, namely: housing, good salaries, public safety, education, and community pride!

    Therefore, we need to stop asking for contracts as a hand out to overcome past discrimination practices to become a partner who’s paid in participation should be recognized and valued and not responding to the right thing to do benovelence of the great white father. The local Black communities need us to be successful inorder for them to be successfu!

    I believe that TIA will recognize some type of plan to include minority contracting and employment training. But, without an agreement for the long range benefit for our community and a method to achieve it we will be in the same position we were before the tax. If there is a dependency factor it is that the Black community relies heavily on external funds for support that’s what the TIA leadership is hoping we fall for–external funds through contracting and employment training. We need to change that paradigm to one that has Black businesses increasing their share of funds support for the community and for that support to being apparent as our businesses grow and hire more people!

    Every dollar spent with Black business has greater potential for circulation within the Black community than those spent with others. That circulation offers the potential for other aspects of the Black community to create jobs not just the businesses. Reserach has shown that every $1M spent with Black businesses creates 10 jobs with 6 going to Blacks. If,for example, 5% more were spent with Black businesses within the region they would create approx 24,000 jobs with approximately 16,000 of the employees being Black. Now that economic development!

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  1. […] Franklin explains on Blogging While Blue, while pondering over that illicit romance between ex-Wall Street Journal reporter Gina Chon and the man who might be the next U.S. ambassador to Iraq: As a divorced woman serving as the city’s CEO, I was not faced with Chon’s ethical dilemma. Maybe I was too old. In fact, fostering any personal relationship was nearly impossible. The scrutiny and eagle eye attention from the public can be a deterrent for any prospective suitor. […]

  2. […] Franklin explains on Blogging While Blue, while pondering over that illicit romance between ex-Wall Street Journal reporter Gina Chon and the man who might be the next U.S. ambassador to Iraq: As a divorced woman serving as the city’s CEO, I was not faced with Chon’s ethical dilemma. Maybe I was too old. In fact, fostering any personal relationship was nearly impossible. The scrutiny and eagle eye attention from the public can be a deterrent for any prospective suitor. […]